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RAISED $ - OUR GOAL $500,000

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NUMBAT (Myrmecobius fasciatus)

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OUR CONSERVATION STATUS 

National: Endangered     
State: Extinct (NSW, NT), Endangered (SA), Vulnerable (WA)

HOW MANY OF US ARE THERE?

< 1,000 individuals

WHERE DO WE LIVE?

The Numbat was originally widespread across southern semi-arid and arid Australia, from western New South Wales through South Australia and southern Northern Territory to the south-west of Western Australia. There are currently two native remnant populations in Western Australia and several reintroduced populations. The two small Western Australia populations were able to survive because both areas have many hollow logs that may serve as refuge from predators.

DID YOUK NOW? 

The Numbat is a marsupial with reddish-brown fur and prominent white, stripes. It also has a dark stripe running across the eye from its ear to mouth. The Numbat can grow to 27.4 cm long and weigh up to 715 g. It has a bushy tail which can grow to 21 cm long.

OUR HABITAT

Numbats now live in eucalypt forests and woodlands. The Numbat has a specialised diet of termites but it is not powerful enough to extract the prey from their mounds so instead must feed on termites when they are active in shallow subsurface soil galleries during the day. The species uses a variety of shelter at night including hollow logs, tree hollows and burrows, and these are also used to avid predators during the day.

FAMILY LIFE

Females occupy exclusive home ranges that overlap with males. During the non-breeding months, males also occupy exclusive home ranges but roam further than usual in the months preceding and during mating. Female Numbats produce one litter (max. of four) per year during summer. Breeding occurs in January and up to four pouch young are carried until about six months old when the female deposits them in one of her dens. Young begin foraging at about eight months and disperse in December.

THREATS TO OUR SURVIVAL
  • Habitat loss and fragmentation due to clearance of native vegetation 
  • Predation from foxes, cats and dogs
  • Inappropriate and changed fire regimes 

Numbats love & Need:

Eucalypts

Eucalypts come in a great range of shapes and sizes – from tall trees to small shrubs. Eucalypts are a dominant part of the Australian flora. Eucalypts range across Australia – the only landscape they are completely absent from is the high alpine areas, though they are scarce in rainforests and in the arid interior of the continent, except where they find refuge along streams and in isolated ranges. READ MORE

Malaleuca

Malaleuca fruit is are woody, cup-shaped, barrel-shaped or almost spherical capsules, often arranged in clusters along the stems. The seeds are sometimes retained in the fruits for many years, only opening when the plant, or part of it dies or is heated in a bushfire. In tropical areas, seeds are released annually in the wet season. READ MORE


Allocasuarina

Allocasuarina trees are notable for their long, segmented branchlets that function as leaves. Formally termed cladodes, these branchlets somewhat resemble pine needles, although sheoaks are actuallyflowering plants. The leaves are reduced to minute scales encircling each joint. Fallen cladodes form a dense, soft mat beneath sheoaks, preventing the development of undergrowth and making sheoak woods remarkably quiet. READ MORE