PLANT A TREE FOR ME!
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RAISED $ - OUR GOAL $500,000

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Northern Quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus)

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OUR CONSERVATION STATUS
  • National: Endangered
  • State: Critically Endangered (NT), Endangered (WA)
HOW MANY OF US ARE THERE?

Unknown but undergoing rapid decline

WHERE DO WE LIVE?

The Northern Quoll previously occurred across most of the northern third of Australia, but its range has declined significantly. The northern quoll occurs from the Pilbara region of Western Australia across the Northern Territory to south east Queensland.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Northern Quoll is the smallest of four species of marsupial carnivore in the genus Dasyurus and they are the most aggressive. The species was first described in 1842 and given the species name hallucatus, which means ‘notable first digit’. This refers to the short ‘thumb’ on the hindfoot, which aids in gripping and climbing. The hindfeet have pads and five toes. It has white spots on its back and rump and a long, unspotted tail. The tail length can reach 35 cm. Northern Quolls can weigh up to 1.2 kg and they are also called the northern Australian native cat.

OUR HABITAT

The Northern Quoll occupies a range of habitats including rocky areas, eucalypt forest and woodlands, rainforests, sandy lowlands and beaches, shrubland, grasslands and desert. Their habitat generally has rocky areas for dens. Dens are made in rock crevices, tree hollows or occasionally termite mounds.

Northern Quolls are opportunistic omnivore predators and scavenge on a range of food including fleshy fruit (figs, native grapes), insects and other invertebrates, amphibians, small reptiles, small birds and rodents, and carrion.

FAMILY LIFE

Northern Quolls breed once each year and bear on average seven young. Females wean two to three young which become reproductively mature at 11 months.

Most Northern Quoll males die at the age of about 12 months, after the short, synchronised breeding period, leaving the females to raise the young alone. This species is the largest animal to be semelparous – the males reproduce only once, usually followed by death.

Young start to eat insects at four months old, and leave the den to forage at five months old, whilst still suckling from their mother. Juveniles are weaned at 6 months old, in November to early December..

THREATS TO OUR SURVIVAL
  • Habitat loss and fragmentation due to clearance of native vegetation
  • Predation from foxes and cats
  • Inappropriate and changed fire regimes
  • Invasive plants
  • Lethal toxic ingestion caused by Cane Toads


Northern Quolls love & need:

Melaleuca

Melaleuca fruits are woody, cup-shaped, barrel-shaped or almost spherical capsules, often arranged in clusters along the stems. The seeds are sometimes retained in the fruits for many years, only opening when the plant, or part of it dies or is heated in a bushfire. In tropical areas, seeds are released annually in the wet season. READ MORE

Eucalyptus

The eucalypt is extremely adaptable. Within species there can be physical adaptations to factors such as soil aspect and proximity to water. For example, the Gippsland Bluegum grows 30–40 metres tall in inland forests and yet it can adapt to exposed coastal cliffs by growing mallee-like (with multiple trunks) and small in height. READ MORE

Ficus

As a group ficus are relatively easy to recognise. Many have aerial roots and a distinctive shape or habit, and their fruits distinguish them from other plants. The fig fruit is an enclosed inflorescence, sometimes referred to as asyconium, an urn-like structure lined on the inside with the fig’s tiny flowers. The unique fig pollination system, involving tiny, highly specific wasps which pollinate and lay their eggs, has been a constant source of inspiration and wonder to biologists. READ MORE