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RAISED $ - OUR GOAL $500,000

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Glossy Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus lathami halmaturinus)

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OUR CONSERVATION STATUS
  • National: Endangered
  • State: Endangered (SA)
  • HOW MANY OF US ARE THERE?

    < 300 Individuals

    WHERE DO WE LIVE?

    The South Australian Glossy Black-Cockatoo has disappeared from the South Australian mainland and is currently restricted to Kangaroo Island (KI).

    DID YOU KNOW?

    The Glossy Black-Cockatoo (KI) is a medium-sized cockatoo about 48 cm in length and up to 515g in weight, with a wing-span of approximately 90cm. The adults are mainly black, with black-brown colouring on the head, neck and underbody, and panels of red (in males) or orange-red with black bars (in females) in the tail. The adult female also has conspicuous yellow patches on the head. 

    OUR HABITAT

    The Glossy Black-Cockatoo (KI) inhabits woodlands that are dominated by Drooping Sheoak and often interspersed with taller stands of Sugar Gum. They feed almost exclusively on the seeds of Drooping Sheoak. It occasionally also feeds on the seeds of Slaty Sheoak and seeds of Acacia. But this extreme dependence on Drooping Sheoak for food makes this subspecies highly vulnerable to any process that might reduce the extent or availability of Drooping Sheoak dominated habitats.

    FAMILY LIFE

    The Glossy Black-Cockatoo (Kangaroo Island) can reach sexual maturity at two years of age. However, most females do not begin breeding until they are at least three and males may not begin breeding until five years of age. They breed from late summer to spring, with eggs laid from January to July, nesting in tree hollows of tall Eucalyptus trees.

    The clutch of the Glossy Black-Cockatoo (Kangaroo Island) consists of a single white egg, incubated by the female for a period of about 30–31 days. The female may lay up to three clutches in a single season if the initial breeding attempts are unsuccessful.

    For the first three weeks after hatching, the male provides food to the brooding female, who in turn feeds the nestling. At approximately three weeks after hatching, the female departs the nest to forage during the day with the male. The nestling remains in the nest for a period of 84–96 days and, after leaving the nest, is fed by both parents. The fledgling continues to be fed for a period of three or four months.

    THREATS TO OUR SURVIVAL
    • Habitat loss and fragmentation due to clearance of native vegetation
    • Psittacine Beak and Feather (Psittacine Circovirus) Disease
    • Removal of eggs or nestlings for the pet trade
    • Loss of genetic diversity due to inbreeding
    • Inappropriate and changed fire regimes

Glossy Black Cockatoos love & need:

Allocasuarina

As with legumes, sheoak roots possess nodules containing symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria; together with their highly drought-adapted foliage, this enables sheoaks to thrive in very poor soil and semi-arid areas. However, sheoaks are much less bushfire-tolerant than eucalypts. READ MORE

Eucalyptus

The eucalypt is extremely adaptable. Within species there can be physical adaptations to factors such as soil aspect and proximity to water. For example, Gippsland Bluegum grows 30–40m tall in inland forests and yet it can adapt to exposed coastal cliffs by growing mallee-like (with multiple trunks) and small in height. READ MORE

Acacia

Acacias in Australia probably evolved their fire resistance about 20 million years ago when fossilised charcoal deposits show a large increase, indicating that fire was a factor even then. With no major mountain ranges or rivers to prevent their spread, the wattles began to spread all over the continent as it dried and fires became more common. They began to form dry, open forests with species of the genera Casuarina, Eucalyptus and Callitris.  READ MORE